The Dirty Dozen

The Dirty Dozen

Know the Dirty Foods and shop organic

Today I want to introduce you to something called the Dirty Dozen–a list of twelve different produce options that the Environmental Working Group considers each year to be highest in toxic pesticides and contamination.  To obtain the most current and accurate information on things such as this yearly, I go to my friends at EWG to help me out.  They will share with you which foods to avoid this year.  If you’re not familiar with them, I can’t encourage you enough to get to know who they are and what they do.  I swear, these people never seem to sleep because they are always advocating for policies that protect global and individual health–and that’s a full-time job!

You will hear me say over and over to shop for organic produce whenever and wherever possible.  But I also know that everyone can’t alway afford to.  So I’ll repeat myself.  Try hard to purchase conventional produce that is on the Clean Fifteen list AND get in the habit of purchasing 1 or 2 organic items whenever possible.  Doing this will keep “quality” food choices in the forefront of your mind!

Looks can be deceiving

Many of my friends tell me that they are still confused when shopping for quality vegetables and fruits.  Like me, they have had many experiences with buying something that looks great on the outside, only to find a few days later, that it’s rotten on the inside. Have you experienced this too?  We have also found that the organic produce can fall victim to this conundrum, though less often than for conventional produce.

Whenever possible, I like to help EWG spread the word about one of its most valuable pieces of research – a Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce.  For nine years federal agencies collected information from pesticide tests performed on produce, and this yearly updated version is a collection of the results from those tests.

How was the data for the Dirty Dozen list obtained?

The report took into consideration how people typically wash and prepare produce. – for example, cucumbers were rinsed or washed and citrus peeled before testing.

What were the results?

In the end, the EWG came up with what they call the “Dirty Dozen“–foods had the highest pesticide load.  The foods on this list should be purchased organic or from your local farmer.  Better yet, why not grow many of them yourself.  You can print off the list here.  Note that this list may change every year!

Why should you care about pesticides on your produce? 

The EWG has shown us that there is a growing consensus among scientists that even small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can have adverse effects on health.  This is especially true during the critical stages of growth for fetal development and as young children are growing.  Pesticides are toxic substances that the body has difficulty getting rid of.  the more you eat, the higher the concentrations.  The higher the concentrations, the more toxic your body becomes.  Toxins cause the body to stop healing thereby decreasing its ability to fight off disease.  Eat clean and stay healthy!

 What other toxic concerns should I consider?

I’d like you to look beyond the residue that surrounds your conventionally grown piece of fruit or vegetable.  I want you to look beyond the US and the loose standards that we have in place.  Even though you may purchase foods that you can peel such as bananas, kiwis, avocados, mangos and citrus, I want you to take into consideration what goes into growing those foods.  Consider the possible groundwater that’s been contaminated due to high use of pesticides and herbicides, and the lack of nutrients in the soil itself.  Industrial plant waste water irrigate farms and damage local ecosystems.  You also have to take into account the time of harvest and travel distance between growers and your neighborhood market.  All of these things can produce products that are questionable.  Our growing children don’t need extra toxins in their small bodies!

What’s the best way to shop for safe foods?

  1. Change your mindset.  I’d like you to always take into consideration quality over price and quantity with anything you eat.  I’ve gotten rather picky over the years and now look to see where by produce is grown.  Grown in Chili, forget it.  Grown in US, better.  Grown in my community, even better.  Purchase foods grown within 100 miles of your home as often as possible.
  2. Buy organic whenever possible, even if you are purchasing the foods listed above.  It will last longer and taste fresher.  The color will be truer and you won’t have to worry as much about hurting you, your children or the fetus you might be carrying.
  3. Stay way from any foods that have been genetically modified or altered.  Apples, Sugar beetspotatoes, tomatoes, squash, bananas, peas and of course corn, are just a few foods found in the produce section that have been genetically modified.  Here’s more information on this subject that everyone should read.
  4. Shop local produce whenever possible!  This is huge.  Take full advantage of your local farmer’s produce.  Your food will taste better, last longer and you’re helping your community farms.  Learn which markets and which restaurants support their area farmers.  Find out what local farms offer CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) programs that you can take advantage of.  I highly suggest this.
  5. Don’t be shy when asking local farmers what practices they use when growing and why they choose certain practices for pest control.  Whenever possible, visit the farmers whom you buy from.  Learn what you can about them and share the information with your friends and family so they can also take advantage of higher eating quality local produce.

What are the Clean Fifteen?

I hope you have found this information helpful.  Now that you know which foods are considered to be full of pesticides, you won’t want to miss knowing which conventional foods you can safely purchase.  These foods will typically have an outer peel that you can remove.  They are called the “Clean 15.”  Get your updated list by clicking here.  Remember, this list can change every year, so I’ll do my best to keep both lists current.  🙂

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